Why Google Gives Europe a ‘reject all’ Button for Tracking Cookies

Google announced a new addition to its privacy settings: the “reject all cookies” button. The button allows European Union (EU) users to refuse all tracking cookies, which are used to collect data about web browsing habits. This announcement comes after the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) went into effect. The GDPR requires companies to get explicit consent from EU citizens before collecting their data.

Google’s new set is designed to make it easier for users to comply with the GDPR. Previously, users had to individually block or allow cookies from each website they visited. With the “reject all cookies” button, they can now simply refuse all cookies with one click.

How much French data protection authority fine Google for failing to comply with the GDPR?

The announcement also comes after Google was fined €50 million (about $57 million) by the French data protection authority, CNIL, for failing to comply with the GDPR. Google has said that it is “studying” the ruling and will appeal the fine.

How many EU users will take advantage of the new setting?

It is not clear how many EU users will take advantage of the new setting. A recent survey found that only about 10% of users were aware of the GDPR and how it would affect them. However, the same survey found that 80% of users said they would be more likely to trust a company if it was clear about how it was using their data.

What do we think of Google’s new “reject all cookies” setting?

Google’s new setting may help to build trust with EU users and show that the company is taking steps to comply with the GDPR. However, it remains to be seen how effective the setting will be in practice.

What do you think of Google’s new “reject all cookies” setting? Let us know in the comments below.

FAQs:

Q: What is the GDPR?

A: The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is a set of regulations that member states of the European Union (EU) must implement in order to protect the privacy of EU citizens. The regulation requires companies to get explicit consent from users before collecting their data and gives users the right to know what data is being collected about them.

Q: What was Google fined for?

A: Google was fined €50 million (about $57 million) by the French data protection authority, CNIL, for failing to comply with the GDPR. Google has said that it is “studying” the ruling and will appeal the fine.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.